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Politics

Do We Still Need to Earn a Living? An Argument for the Guaranteed Basic Income

Radix Admin

By Sarah Mayela Ramírez '18

If you were to ask a random person on the street “What is one of the biggest, most persistent social problems in the world?”, it is likely you will hear some reiteration of “poverty” in response. Despite advances in modern society and technology, poverty continues to be a scourge, with wealth gaps in many countries actually widening as opposed to shrinking. This has been the case despite attempts at various welfare programs, including SNAP, housing assistance, and Supplemental Security Income here in the United States. The rhetoric in the U.S. surrounding welfare is clear; recipients are lazy, undisciplined, and require rules and guidelines for their aid to “appropriately” lift themselves out of poverty. This viewpoint is deeply entrenched in our society; our careers inform our identities and we idealize an over-worked, over-exhausted culture. In fact, many forms of welfare are only available if the individual is working; any person not working is considered a “leech” on taxpayer money.

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Something You Should Be Concerned About

Radix Admin

By Maddie Cook '18

Journalists have an obligation to spread the news. In fact, journalists often take on some of the toughest issues. Historically they have exposed some of the most profound injustices in the world with a mission to make the public aware so that it can take action if it wishes to do so. This continues to be the main role of journalist today. 

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Your Silence is Deafening

Radix Admin

By Guest Writer Jamie Faye '16

I’ve been staring at this blank screen for days trying to come up with the perfect personal anecdote with which to begin this article. I could have jumped right in, shocking all of you with one of my grandma’s Auschwitz memories and using that to smoothly segue into how being a third generation Holocaust survivor has affected me to this day. Or, alternatively, I could have walked all of you through the radical thought process I experienced when I decided to get a Star of David permanently tattooed on my skin a few weeks ago.

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Hillary Clinton and the Abuse of Feminism in the 2016 Presidential Race

Radix Admin

By Sarah Mayela Ramírez, '17

Before I delve into my argument, I want to make one thing loud and clear: I believe that the only form of true feminism is intersectional feminism, a form of feminism first named by American scholar Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw. I reject the mainstream feminist narrative that inherently ties “progress” to capitalist goals. I believe that if someone truly believes in gender equality, they will consider all experiences under the highly-generalized “woman” label, including the experiences of women of color, trans women, poor women, and people with vaginas. These experiences are not the same but in many ways are vastly distinct in their lived realities. Thus, any form of feminism that purposefully or non-purposefully prioritizes one form of woman over the other is not feminism, but another form of oppression. 

Now, let us talk about Hillary Clinton's campaign.

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Not Your Mother's Radical Feminism

Radix Admin

By Gerry Carolina Rivadeneira '16, Guest Writer

I didn’t realize I was a feminist until I met my seventh grade teacher in civics class. She was a white womxn from Texas who was in the process of divorcing her husband and ended up in the middle of Miami, Florida. The first Friday of the school year, she wore a hot pink shirt that read in black letters, “well behaved women seldom make history.” At the time I thought that quote was genius, because it would serve as a great response to my parent’s reproaches for not finishing my chores. “Who said that quote?” I asked my teacher, Ms. LG. “The feminist, Thatcher Ulrich,” she replied as she closed her old public school textbook and dismissed our class. Such a simple answer, but such a puzzling response for my thirteen-year-old self.

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The Danger of Good Enough

Radix Admin

By Sarah M. Ramirez

Throughout my life, I have been raised in affluent, white, liberal New England towns. Rather than growing up subject to many stereotypes of what it means to be Latin@, I am white-passing, I was raised in an middle-upper class household, and I have two parents who both hold postgraduate degrees. Although my identity often conflicts with itself in the social world (stereotypes of Latin@s do not go hand-in-hand with dominant white culture), it also allows me to view many issues with a dual lense of understanding. Although I identify as a Latina, and although my father was an immigrant from a lower-class background, I consider myself a privileged progressive. Privileged progressives are those who are liberal in their political ideology yet also hold social positions of power, such as being affluent and white.  I have often found myself smacking my head against the wall when it comes to discussing minority issues with other privileged progressives, and this frustration came up again during the 2016 election season.

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When is Equality Not Equality?

Radix Admin

By Madeline Klein

 

          As recently as a few months ago, Democrats and feminists were preparing to support Hillary Clinton’s 2016 run for president. Their reasoning was simple: after Barack Obama made history as our first Black president, it seemed time for Clinton to make history again as the first female president. At the time, it seemed unlikely that there would be a woman on the Republican ticket. It seemed equally unlikely for the GOP to acquire many female voters. In the past year, the Republican Party had gained a reputation on the internet, and in some of the mainstream media, for being out-of-touch and ignorant about women’s concerns at best, and openly misogynistic at worst. While several women would be running as third-party candidates, among them Jill Stein on the Green Party ticket, and Shawna Sterling running independently, Hillary Clinton had the best chance of winning.

 

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